Germany Spends Less on Care than Many Other Countries

Germany spends far less money on care for the elderly than other European countries. In particular, the Scandinavian countries and the Benelux countries stand out. These countries invest significantly more money in inpatient care for the elderly and sick. This has resulted in a response from the federal government to a parliamentary question from the left-wing faction, which is available to the RedaktionsNetzwerk Deutschland .

The data are based on comparative figures from the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). They take into account what percentage of the gross domestic product (GDP) a country spends on elderly care. In Germany, expenditure in statutory long-term care insurance is used. The most recent expenditure here was around 42 billion euros per year. However, the expenditure from 2017 was compared for the OECD study. At that time, expenditure in statutory long-term care insurance was 38.52 billion euros – that was 1.5 percent of the gross domestic product.

In contrast, it was 2.7 percent of GDP in Norway and Sweden, and 2.3 percent in Denmark. The Netherlands also spent more money on care – the Danes put 2.5 percent of their economic output into the care of the elderly and the sick. In Belgium it was 2.1 percent. In Iceland, Switzerland and Finland too, more money was spent on care in relation to economic output than in Germany.

In order to catch up with Scandinavia, for example, public care expenditure in Germany would have to increase by around 30 billion euros per year. However, this is not possible under the given circumstances – even today, the expenditure of the statutory long-term care insurance exceeds the income, so recently the long-term care contribution has been increased slightly.

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Germany spends far less money on care for the elderly than other European countries

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