Migraine Hides an Untreated Disease in Women with Age

Migraine patients may have an increased risk of developing dementia early in life, according to a Canadian study.

The study suggests that almost three times as likely, older women with dementia had a history of migraines at a younger age.

The results showed that Alzheimer’s disease is particularly linked to migraines, which affects one in five women and one in 12 men.

The researchers believe that severe headaches may cause inflammation in the brain, which leads to neurological damage causing memory loss.

Nearly 700 people aged 65 and over were questioned about their history of migraines and were followed for five years, during which 51 people were dementia.

Perhaps because the study was small, and women were three times more likely to have migraines, the men involved in the study who had dementia had no history of migraines.

In contrast, the results found that people with Alzheimer’s had a greater than 4.2 times the probability of having a history of migraines.

This means that migraine sufferers are at the highest risk of this mental deterioration, which needs to be closely monitored for early detection of confusion and forgetfulness, one of the first signs of the disease.

“So far we have no way to treat Alzheimer’s, so prevention is essential,” said Dr. Susan Tias, lead author of the study from the University of Waterloo in Canada. “Determining the link to migraines provides evidence to guide new Alzheimer’s prevention strategies.”

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Migrain Women with Age - /10

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Migraine patients may have an increased risk of developing dementia early in life, according to a Canadian study.

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