“Super Bacteria are One of the Hidden Risks of Coronavirus”

CNBC reported that Merck executive vice president Julie Gerberding said in an interview on Wednesday (May 13) that superbugs are one of the risks of coronavirus potential, and every 7 hospitalized Approximately one in patients with coronavirus has a secondary bacterial infection. She told CNBC’s “Squawk Box Asia” program that she was very worried that many people would be killed by these deadly super infections (not coronaviruses).

Gerberding served as director of the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) from 2002-2009. She pointed out that although super antibiotics can be eradicated by complex antibiotics, because bacteria or viruses are more resistant than drugs are developed, there is a shortage of useful drugs. According to a study published in the Lancet Medical Journal, physicians studied more than 190 patients with novel coronavirus (COVID-19) in two hospitals in Wuhan and found that secondary infections occurred in half of the dead patients.

Australia ’s largest national scientific research organization, the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization (CSIRO), pointed out on Thursday that it is estimated that super bacteria (or antibiotic resistance, AMR) may cause as many as 10 million deaths each year by This is higher than the 700,000 people in the past year.

CSIRO surveyed 2,217 Australian adults and found that up to 92% of the respondents did not know the difference between viral and bacterial infections. In addition, 13% of Australians mistakenly believe that coronavirus can be treated with antibiotics.

19% of Australians surveyed believe that the treatment of common cold depends on antibiotics. In addition, 14% of the respondents indicated that they would use antibiotics prophylactically when traveling abroad.

Paul De Barro, Director of Biosafety Research at CSIRO, said the findings of the survey are worrying. He said that the misuse and abuse of antibiotics is a big problem, because it encourages the emergence of drug-resistant “super bacteria.” When humans run out of effective antibiotics, they will return to the dark age of medicine before the 1940s, when scratches or simple infections could be fatal.

Some estimates suggest that by 2050, super bacteria may cost the global economy US $ 100 trillion, and Australia ’s gross domestic product (GDP) is expected to shrink by 5-10%.

Ronan McCarthy, a lecturer in biomedical sciences at Brunel University in London, published an article on theconversation.com on April 22, stating that “super bacteria may cause as many as 10 million deaths per year in 2050” are estimated figures for 2016. COVID-19 appears, so this forecast schedule almost certainly needs to be revised.

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"Super Bacteria are One of the Hidden Risks of Coronavirus" - /10

Summary

CNBC reported that Merck executive vice president Julie Gerberding said in an interview on Wednesday (May 13) that superbugs are one of the risks of coronavirus potential, and every 7 hospitalized Approximately one in patients with coronavirus has a secondary bacterial infection. She told CNBC's "Squawk Box Asia" program that she was very worried that many people would be killed by these deadly super infections (not coronaviruses).

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