Fever is not Necessarily a Cold

The formal name of the disease we usually call “cold” is “cold syndrome“. Eighty to ninety percent of the causes are due to “viral infection.” In general.

Fever is not Necessarily a Cold In general, the virus floating in the air enters the nose and throat by inhaling and multiplies on mucou membranes to cause inflammation. If the inflammation spreads to the nose, symptoms such as runny nose and congestion may occur, and if it spreads to the throat, coughs and other symptoms may occur.

One of the symptoms of such a cold is “fever“. But why do you get fever when you get a virus attack? Is fever a bad thing for the human body in the first place?

When fever was developed in the 18th and 19th centuries, fever was a pathological condition, and the idea was that “you should take it immediately and correct it.” However, the phenomenon of fever is now understood as “one of the biological defense functions” that help the body protect itself.

Viruses have “property to grow at low temperatures”, but are suppressed by fever. For example, rhinovirus, which causes inflammation of the nose and throat, is most active at 33 ° C, and influenza virus is around 37 ° C. But if the fever exceeds the temperature preferred by the virus, they will be less likely to multiply. When the body temperature rises, the activity of leukocytes becomes active, and the effect of fighting invaders such as invading viruses increases, and the immune function also increases.

For adults, the so-called fever means that the body temperature exceeds 37.8 degrees Celsius.

If the baby is less than three months old, the temperature rises to 38 degrees Celsius, the child is 38.9 degrees Celsius, and the adult is 40 degrees Celsius, you must see a doctor.

Most people touch their foreheads to find out if they have a fever, but this is not the best way.

You should use a thermometer. You can shake the thermometer, rinse it with cold water, and put it under your tongue for three minutes.

-After a few hours in a hot place, I started to have a fever, no sweating, a rapid heartbeat, unconsciousness, and loss of consciousness.

Possible cause: heat stroke.

-What should you do: Take it to the emergency department immediately.

– Fever, and accompanied by severe headache, you will feel pain, nausea, photophobia, lethargy, unconsciousness, and red or purple rash on your body when you bend down.

Possible cause: Meningitis-inflammation of the membrane covering the spinal cord and brain.

– What should you do: Take it to the emergency department immediately.

– Fever, closed teeth, muscle cramps and pain, sweating, and difficulty swallowing.

Possible cause: Tetanus-a bacterial infection from the wound.

– What should you do: Take it to the emergency department immediately.

– Suddenly high fever, vomiting, diarrhea, red rash on the body, fatigue, headache, unconsciousness, dizziness.

Possible cause: Toxic shock syndrome.

– What should you do: Take it to the emergency department immediately.

-Child: Fever, sudden cramps, and complexion.

Possible cause: Fever spasms.

– What should you do: If the fever is severe and lasts for several minutes, you should be taken to the emergency room immediately. Otherwise, keep the child away from sharp objects and lie on his side. In most cases, this is not a big deal.

– Fever, chills, heart thumping, unconsciousness, and signs of infection.

Possible cause: blood poisoning.

– What should you do: call the doctor immediately, if you can’t find the doctor, send it to the emergency room directly.

– Slight fever, pain in the right lower abdomen, nausea and vomiting.

Possible cause: appendicitis.

– What should you do: See your doctor as soon as possible. Do not eat or take laxatives. Surgery may be necessary.

– At the beginning of a slight fever, after one to three weeks, the temperature will rise, the pelvic cavity will be painful, the vaginal stinky vaginal discharge will come out, and pain will occur during urination.

Possible cause: Inflammation of the pelvic cavity.

– What should you do: See a doctor as soon as possible.

-Fever, cough, or dry cough, chest pain, shortness of breath, abdominal pain.

Possible cause: pneumonia.

– What should you do: See a doctor as soon as possible.

– Suddenly started to have a fever, sore throat, white covering of the tonsils, and a noticeable rash after 24 hours.

Possible cause: Scarlet fever.

– What should you do: See a doctor as soon as possible.

– Fever, night sweats, enlarged lymph nodes, repeated infections, weight loss, fatigue, diarrhea, and ulcers.

Possible cause: HIV infection, AIDS.

– What should you do: Ask your doctor for advice and arrange for a test.

– Slight fever, nausea or lack of appetite, yellowing of skin or eyes, brown urine, lightening of stool, fatigue.

Possible cause: hepatitis.

– What to do: Ask your doctor for advice and make an appointment.

-Fatigue that lasts for weeks or months, sore throat, fever, and enlarged lymph glands.

Possible cause: Mononuclear leukopenia—a disease of the filtered virus that is transmitted through close contact, such as kissing, which invades the respiratory system, liver, spleen, and lymph glands. Most of them occur in adolescents or young people.

– What should you do: Ask your doctor for advice. It usually takes ten to six months to recover, and then you can slowly return to normal living.

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Summary

,The formal name of the disease we usually call "cold" is "cold syndrome". Eighty to ninety percent of the causes are due to "viral infection." In general.

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