Travel Guide During The COVID-19 Outbreak

Traveling increases the chance of spreading and contracting COVID-19. Delaying travel and staying at home is the best way to protect yourself and others from COVID-19.

If you are considering traveling, here are some important questions to ask yourself and your loved ones beforehand. These questions can help you determine the best practice for you and your family.

Are you, one of your family members, or the person you are going to visit a group at high risk of severe COVID-19?
If you are infected, even if you do not show symptoms, you may spread the virus to your loved ones while traveling and returning. If you have one or more family members who are at high risk of severe illness, all family members should regard themselves as high-risk groups and take corresponding measures. Learn how to protect yourself and others.

Is the number of cases in your community or destination large or increasing? The more cases there are in the community or destination, the more likely it is to catch and spread COVID-19 due to visits. View the number of cases in each state in the last 7 days.
Is the hospital in your community or destination crowded with COVID-19 patients? To find out, check the websites of state and local public health departments.
Are there requirements or restrictions on travelers in your location or destination? Please check state and local requirements before departure.
In the 14 days before the trip, did you or the person you are visiting have close contact with people who are not living with you?
The following activities may put you at a higher risk of COVID-19:
Attend large social gatherings, such as weddings, funerals, or parties.
Participate in mass gatherings, such as sports events, concerts or parades.
In crowded people, such as restaurants, bars, fitness centers or cinemas.
Take the train, bus, stop at the airport or use public transportation.

Travel by cruise or river boat.

Does your plan include traveling on a bus, train, or plane that is difficult to maintain a 6-foot physical distance?
Are you traveling with non-residents?
If you answer “yes” to any of these questions, you should consider other plans, such as delayed travel.

If you decide to travel
Traveling may increase your chances of spreading and contracting COVID-19. Delaying travel and staying at home is the best way to protect yourself and others from COVID-19. If you decide to travel, be sure to take the following steps during your trip to protect yourself and others from COVID-19:

Check travel restrictions information before departure.
Get the flu vaccine before traveling.
Bring extra supplies, such as masks and hand sanitizer.
Know when to delay travel. If you or your travel companion is sick, please do not travel.
In public places, including taking public transportation and in transportation hubs such as airports and stations, you should wear a mask to cover your mouth and nose.
Keep at least 6 feet (approximately 2 arms long) away from anyone who is not part of your traveling group to avoid close contact.
Wash your hands frequently or use hand sanitizer (with at least 60% alcohol).
Avoid contact with people who are sick.
Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth.
Consider getting tested
Detection can improve the safety of travelers.

The safest way is to stay at home, but if you decide to travel, getting tested can help increase safety. You and your travel companions (including children) may feel well and have no symptoms, but you may still spread COVID-19 to others in a busy travel environment (such as at airports, buses, and train stations). You may also spread the virus to family, friends and your community after traveling. Testing does not eliminate all risks, but it can help travelers improve safety.

If you are traveling, please consider getting tested for the virus 1-3 days before the trip. In addition, please consider taking a virus test 3-5 days after travel. Even if the test result is negative, you should reduce non-essential activities for a full 7 days after travel. If you are not tested, please consider reducing non-essential activities within 10 days after travel.
Bring a copy of your test results with you during your travel, in case you are required to show it.
If you test positive, do not travel; you should self-quarantine immediately and follow public health recommendations.
You may have been exposed to COVID-19 during travel. You and your travel companions (including children) may pose risks to your family, friends and community. No matter where you travel or what you do during the journey, you should take the following measures within 14 days of travel to protect others from COVID-19:
It is important to keep at least 6 feet/2 meters (approximately 2 arm lengths) away from people who are not traveling with you, especially in crowded areas. This measure should be taken in all places indoors and outdoors.
When you are in public places outside your home, including when taking public transportation, please wear a mask to cover your mouth and nose.
If someone in your family does not travel with you, you should wear a mask and require everyone in the family to wear a mask in the shared space at home.
Wash your hands frequently or use a hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol.
Avoid coexisting with people at high risk of severe illness.
Monitor health status: Watch out for COVID-19 symptoms. If you feel unwell, check your temperature.
Are you traveling abroad? Before planning a trip, you should review CDC’s COVID-19 travel recommendations by destination.

Estimated travel demand
Take daily precautions 14 days before travel, such as wearing a mask, maintaining social distancing and washing hands frequently. Avoid the following activities that may put you at a higher risk of COVID-19:

Attend large social gatherings, such as weddings, funerals, or parties.
Participate in mass gatherings, such as sports events, concerts or parades.
In crowded people, such as restaurants, bars, fitness centers or cinemas.
Take the train, bus, stop at the airport or use public transportation.
Travel by cruise or river boat.
Carry a mask with you so you can wear it in public places and when using public transportation.
Carry a hand sanitizer containing at least 60% alcohol, and it is easy to use at any time.
Bring enough medicine for the entire journey.
Bring food and water in case restaurants and shops close, or there is no drive-through service, takeaway, and outdoor dining options.
If you are considering cleaning your travel accommodation, please refer to CDC’s guidelines on how to clean and disinfect.
Consider getting tested for the virus 1-3 days before travel. Carry a copy of the test results with you during the trip, in case you are required to show it.
If you test positive, do not travel; you should self-quarantine immediately and follow public health recommendations.
View travel restrictions
State, local, and regional governments may impose travel restrictions, including testing requirements, home orders, and quarantine requirements upon arrival. For the most up-to-date information and travel guidelines, please check with the state and local health authorities in your state, places of transit, and destination. As restrictions and policies during travel may change, stay flexible during travel. Observe all state, local, and regional travel restrictions.

If traveling by air, please check if your airline requires any health information, test certificates or other documents. The local policies of your destination may require you to be tested for COVID-19. If the test result is positive on arrival, you may need to quarantine for some time.

After traveling
You may have been exposed to COVID-19 during your travels. You may feel good and have no symptoms, but you can still spread the virus to others. You and your travel companions (including children) may pose risks to your family, friends and community after traveling.

Please consider taking a virus test 3-5 days after travel. Even if the test result is negative, reduce non-essential activities for a full 7 days after travel. If you are not tested, consider reducing non-essential activities within 10 days.

If your test positive, please self-isolate to protect others from infection.
The following measures should also be taken within 14 days after your travel and return to protect others from COVID-19:

It is important to keep at least 6 feet/2 meters (approximately 2 arm lengths) away from people who are not traveling with you, especially in crowded areas. This measure should be taken in all places indoors and outdoors.
When you are in public places outside your home, including when taking public transportation, please wear a mask to cover your mouth and nose.
If someone in your family does not travel with you, you should wear a mask and require everyone in the family to wear a mask in the shared space at home.

Wash your hands frequently or use a hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol.
Avoid coexisting with people at high risk of severe illness.
Monitor health status: Watch out for COVID-19 symptoms. If you feel unwell, check your temperature.

Are you traveling abroad? Before planning a trip, you should review CDC’s COVID-19 travel recommendations by destination.

Precautions for various travel types
Traveling increases the chance of spreading and contracting COVID-19. Certain travel activities, such as your choice of transportation and residence, may increase the risk of contracting COVID-19. Understand the risks of travel. The chance of contracting COVID-19 while traveling also depends on whether you and those around you take measures to protect yourself and others, such as wearing a mask and keeping 6 feet away from people outside the travel group (social distance). Airports, bus stations, train stations and rest stops are all places where travelers may be exposed to air and surface viruses. It is also difficult to maintain social distance in these places. Generally speaking, the longer you spend with COVID-19 patients, the greater the likelihood of infection.

Air travel

Air travel requires a period of time at security check lanes and airport terminals, which may put you in close contact with others and frequent surfaces. Due to the way the air is circulated and filtered on the plane, most viruses and other bacteria are not easily spread on the plane. However, it is difficult to maintain social distancing on crowded flights, and it is necessary to sit within 6 feet of others, sometimes as long as several hours, which may increase the risk of contracting COVID-19. The way you travel to and from the airport, such as taking public transportation and car sharing, may also increase your chances of contracting the virus.

Bus or train travel

Long-distance travel by bus and train may require staying in a crowded waiting room, sitting or standing within 6 feet of others, which may increase the risk of contracting COVID-19. If you choose to travel by bus or train, learn how to protect yourself on public transportation.

Car travel

Stopping for gas, eating or going to the toilet on the way may bring you and your travel companions into close contact with others and frequently touched surfaces.

Motorhome travel

An RV trip may not have to stop frequently to eat or go to the bathroom, but it usually means spending the night in an RV park and refueling and shopping in other public places. These stays may bring you and your fellow travellers into close contact with others.

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