How to Hack A Smartphone and How to Defend Yourself

Do you use Wi-Fi when you go to clubs? Yes. Then you are the favorite target of hackers, so let’s see how to protect yourself. You are one of those always connected, on the other hand, free Internet in most restaurants, hotels, airports and cafes. But, just because it’s available and free doesn’t mean you have to use it. At least not without precautions. So let’s see how to hack a smartphone and how to defend against a hacker.

How to hack a smartphone?
Hacking someone’s smartphone isn’t as difficult as you might think. There is no need to be an expert hacker locked up in the basement of a basement. Nowadays, free software available online automates most of the work.

And while you may be thinking “I’m certainly not their target,” hackers have already targeted you. Since hacking is no longer particularly difficult or time-consuming and labor-intensive, stealing our information from our smartphones has become very profitable.

Even if you don’t have bank details saved on your smartphone, your browsing data can be very valuable to many. So how to hack a smartphone?

There are many ways hackers can infiltrate your phone and steal your sensitive data.

The Man in the Middle attack: what it is and how it works
Perhaps the easiest way for cybercriminals to intercept your data is via an unsecured internet connection. For example, that free WiFi you connect to often.

A Man-in-the-Middle attack occurs when a hacker uses a computer or smartphone to hack a modem, to replace it. If they succeed, they can redirect your internet traffic to their device and steal all your data. They can also show you information that is not on the website you are visiting, but on a trap site.

What may seem like a harmless joke can be used by hackers to steal passwords and bank details.

Furthermore, they can see everything you are doing and possibly steal sensitive information to use against you.

A Man-in-the-Middle attack occurs when a hacker uses a computer or smartphone to hack a modem, to replace it. If they succeed, they can redirect your internet traffic to their device and steal all your data. They can also show you information that is not on the website you are visiting, but on a trap site.

What may seem like a harmless joke can be used by hackers to steal passwords and bank details.

Furthermore, they can see everything you are doing and possibly steal sensitive information to use against you.

Another way hackers can get your password is by using social engineering. A perpetrator first investigates the intended victim to gather the necessary basic information, such as potential entry points and weak security protocols, necessary to proceed with the attack.

Then, the attacker takes steps to gain the victim’s trust and provide incentives for subsequent actions that violate security practices, such as revealing sensitive information or granting access to critical resources.

How to protect yourself then?
There is no need to give up WiFi if you are in a restaurant or bar or stop using technology when it comes to financial information. There are some simple security measures you can use to stay safe online.

Here’s how to protect your devices while using an open network.

1. Disable automatic WiFi connection
If your device automatically connects to any open network in the area you are in, you need to disable it immediately. If you don’t, your smartphone may connect to a random network when you are on the street without realizing it.

2. Use a VPN
One of the simplest things you could do is install a VPN and use it as often as possible. This is especially important when using an open network; if the router isn’t encrypting your data properly, your VPN will do it for you.

Not to mention, VPNs also offer a “kill switch” that disconnects you from the internet if your VPN app crashes. This ensures that you never browse unprotected.

The only thing you need to do is get in the habit of activating your VPN before connecting to the Internet.

3. Stick to HTTPS websites
If you find yourself needing to use public Wi-Fi but don’t have access to a VPN, it’s best to stick to HTTPS websites. Those websites tightly encrypt the traffic. This technology makes data much more difficult for a hacker to hijack.

To make sure you always use secure websites, keep an eye on the additional “s” in the URL or the padlock symbol that most browsers show. But if you want everything to be automated, there are browser extensions that warn you before entering an unsecured website. Chrome also does this automatically.

If you access an unsecured website, do not download anything, do not enter passwords or private information.

4. Use antivirus software
If you are not very tech savvy and think you may be prey to these scams or download something malicious, get an antivirus for your smartphone. Antivirus software can detect incoming attacks and malware and intercept them for you. It also sends you a warning, letting you know that what you are doing is not safe.

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