Turkish PM Visits Iraq

Turkish Prime Minister Binali Yıldırım arrived in Baghdad on Saturday for a two-day visit, according to a report on Iraqi state TV. It’s the first such visit since the two governments quarreled over the presence of unauthorized Turkish troops in northern Iraq, straining relations between the two neighbors fighting the Islamic State group.

The report didn’t give details on Yıldırım’s schedule. On his Twitter account, the Turkish Ambassador to Baghdad, Faruk Kaymakcı, said that “We hope that his visit will open a new chapter in Turkey-Iraq relations.”

The presence of some 500 Turkish troops in the Bashiqa region, northeast of the IS-held city of Mosul, has stirred tension with Baghdad since late last year. Iraq has demanded their withdrawal, saying they are there without permission and are in “blatant violation” of Iraqi sovereignty. Turkey says the troops were invited by local Iraqi authorities and has ignored the calls.

The issue has led to a war of words between the two nations’ leaders as Iraqi government troops launched a massive military operation to recapture Mosul on Oct. 17. Ankara has insisted that its forces should take part in retaking the city, but Baghdad has refused.

The issue of the Turkish forces in Bashiqa grew into a rare and bitter public feud last year between Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan and Iraqi Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi.

At one point, Erdoğan gave a speech telling al-Abadi to “know his place,” and adding, “you are not at my level, you are not my equivalent, you are not of the same quality as me.”

Al-Abadi responded by mocking Erdogan’s use of a video messaging app during Turkey’s failed coup last year.

 

In a press conference on Thursday, Erdoğan’s spokesman said that Yıldırım’s discussions in Iraq will include the Bashiqa dispute, the fight against IS, and the Kurdish Turkish separatist group known as the PKK which has used Iraqi territory to launch attacks inside Turkey.

Turkey has also deepened its involvement in the war in neighboring Syria, where its forces and allied Syrian opposition fighters are battling both IS extremists and U.S.-backed Syrian Kurdish forces. Last month, Russia, which backs the Syrian government, and Turkey, a strong supporter of Syria’s moderate opposition, brokered the current shaky cease-fire, which came into effect on Dec. 30.

Meanwhile Saturday, Iraqi troops pushed deeper into eastern Mosul, entering four neighborhoods, according to the operation’s commander Lt. Gen. Abdul-Amir Raheed Yar Allah. He said in a statement that the troops had “liberated” the neighborhoods of Rifaq, Atibaa 1st and Atibaa, as well as Ghufran along the Tigris river, but didn’t elaborate on whether pockets of resistance still remained.

Yar Allah also announced the capture of the Salah and Shafaa hospitals in the Wahda neighborhood as well as a 186-building residential complex in the northern Hadbaa neighborhood.

Iraq’s second-largest city, Mosul fell to IS in the summer of 2014 as the militants swept over much of the country’s north and central areas. If successful, the retaking of the city would be the biggest blow yet to IS. Mosul is the largest remaining city in the self-declared IS “caliphate” spanning Iraq and Syria.

Elsewhere, Turkish fighter jets struck 11 Kurdish militant targets around Qandil in northern Iraq Friday, according to Turkey’s military.

F-16s and F-4s pounded rebel positions, shelters and ammunition depots belonging to the PKK, or Kurdistan Workers’ Party, the military said in a written statement.

The PKK, which has been fighting an insurgency since 1984, resumed attacks in Turkey after a fragile peace process with the government collapsed in 2015. The group is considered a terror organization by Turkey and its western allies.

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