A Egyptian Mummy‘s Voice Heard for the First Time in 3,000 Years Using 3D-Printing

A famous Egyptian mummy‘s “voice” has been heard for the first time in 3,000 years after researchers recreated the long-dead priest’s vocal cords using modern 3D-printing technology.

In detail, scientists at Britain’s Royal Holloway University revealed what a mummified Egyptian priest who lived 3,000 years ago looked like by 3D printing of his vocal tract.

Mummy, can you hear me? Researchers say they’ve mimicked the voice of a 3,000-year-old Egyptian mummy by recreating much of its vocal tract using medical scanners, 3D printing and an electronic larynx.

In turn, David Howard, a professor of electrical engineering at the university, explained that the mummy belongs to an Egyptian priest called “Nessiamon”, and he lived during the reign of Pharaoh Ramses XI, explaining that the sound heard in the passage is the sound of the vocal paths that filter the sound produced from the air that It passes through the throat.

David also chose Nessamon’s mummy, which was in the British city of Leeds Museum, because the soft tissues in the throat and vocal system were reasonably intact, and the mummy was scanned in CT in 2016, to obtain all the measurements needed to reproduce the vocal canal, hich bends from the throat to the lips, and together with his team used computer software to determine the airway inside the mummy coffin.

The airway was printed in 3D, or 3D technology, using plastic materials similar to the one used to make “Lego” bricks, after which the airway was connected to a loudspeaker inside a commonly used artificial throat for electronic speech, and after playing the voice in the artificial larynx, everyone heard a sound The word “ah” and “oh”, and the researchers suggested that the sound is a word that falls between the vowels and it is moving sounds, which contribute to determining the pronunciation of the word, and comes out from the top of the throat.

“David” emphasized that the voice that everyone heard was the sound that was produced and not the real voice of the mummy, as the muscles of the tongue faded and most of them did not exist, and it is believed that the priest died in the mid-fifties, and was suffering from gum disease and severe dental damege.

In this context, the Egyptian team scientists explained that the acoustics and the music of the songs were known in the past, and in principle the priest can issue different sounds, which helps in producing parts of what he actually sang. To do this, computer programs will be used to build the tongue based on the average vocal tract of this size.

 

Reviewer overview

A Egyptian Mummy‘s Voice Heard Using 3D-Printing - /10

Summary

A famous Egyptian mummy‘s “voice” has been heard for the first time in 3,000 years after researchers recreated the long-dead priest’s vocal cords using modern 3D-printing technology.

0 Bad!