Brexit on the English Premier League “Catastrophic”

The UK exit from the European Union means that English clubs will find it more difficult to employ European players under the age of 18 in their academies.

FIFA regulations to protect minors allow the international transfer of football players between the ages of 16 and 18 if they move between European Union-based clubs.

By the time Britain completes its exit from the European Union, the UK will not be in the territory of the European Union, which will hamper the Premier League’s ability to attract promising football talents.

Not only will players be affected by Brexit’s fallout, the past two decades have seen a remarkable influx of coaches from Europe into the Premier League.

Among the 20 clubs that play in the Premier League, there are ten clubs that are coached by non-British people and are among the best football coaches in the world, such as Spanish Pep Guardiola, German Jurgen Klopp, Italian Carlo Ancelotti and Jose Mourinho.

Besides coaches and players, the football industry has long used the employment and experience of European Union workers at all levels, and all of them will face the same restrictions and difficulties that players will face.

In addition to the long-term repercussions of the inability to recruit the best footballers freely from all over Europe, the Premier League clubs will have to deal with the financial implications of Britain leaving the European Union.

English clubs were affected by the initial tremors resulting from the UK’s vote to leave the European Union due to the devaluation of the British pound against the euro, which made it difficult for British clubs to sign players in a hot competitive market.

With the devaluation of the British pound, and the restrictions imposed on the above-mentioned players, it is possible that players outside of Britain prefer to go to other leagues such as Italy and Spain instead of playing in the English Premier League.

The English Premier League is classified as the richest and strongest in the world, with its global broadcasting rights reaching billions of dollars, and five clubs in the cities of Manchester, Liverpool and London constitute half of the list of the ten richest clubs in the world.

This is partly due to the fact that the league attracts the best players in the world, which has caused competition to flourish in the last 20 years, as 11 English clubs reached the Champions League final since the turn of the millennium in the 2000-2001 season, and four teams managed to win European Cups during the period Itself.

The money earned from broadcasting rights helped ensure the clubs’ ability to attract the best football talent in the world, but nevertheless the “stronger league legend” could disappear in the event of exit from the European Union, which would create a relatively restrictive work environment and affect the financial influence of English clubs.

 

Reviewer overview

Brexit on the English Premier League "Catastrophic" - /10

Summary

The UK exit from the European Union means that English clubs will find it more difficult to employ European players under the age of 18 in their academies.

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