Eating Right can Help Regulate Mood

A recent study published in the journal BMC Medicine showed that people with moderate to severe depression experienced improved mood when they ate a healthier diet. Eating healthy means eating whole foods and avoiding refined, fried, and sweet foods. More than 30 percent of people with depression experience relief after an antidepressant diet.

9 Antidepressant Foods

Eating the right foods naturally makes you feel better 9 foods to fight depression

Many factors can lead to depression. Studies have found that eating the right foods can improve mental health and control depression.

1. Mushrooms

Mushrooms are an antidepressant food for two reasons: they lower blood sugar levels, smoothing out your mood, and they promote gut health like probiotics do. Most of the serotonin in our body is made by nerve cells in the gut, and serotonin is an important neurotransmitter. In other words, a healthy gut means a healthier brain.

2. Avocado

Avocados contain healthy fats in the form of oleic acid, which are good for the brain. The average avocado also contains 4 grams of protein and contains different types of B vitamins, vitamin C, E-12, and is low in sugar and high in fiber.

3. Berries

An antidepressant diet includes blueberries, raspberries, blackberries, and strawberries because they are rich in antioxidants. Several studies have shown that people who consume high amounts of antioxidants have lower levels of depression.

4. Dark leafy greens

Dark leafy greens like spinach and kale are nutrient-dense anti-inflammatory fighters. A 2015 study published in JAMA Psychiatry found that severe depression is associated with brain inflammation. Leafy green vegetables contain high amounts of vitamins A, C, E, K, as well as minerals and anti-inflammatory phytochemicals.

5. Onion

Onions contain anti-inflammatory flavonoid antioxidants that help fight depression. (Shutterstock)
Onions aren’t necessarily in every antidepressant diet, but some experts, including noted physician Dr. Joel Fuhrman, believe that onions can help fight depression. Onions and garlic can reduce the risk of gastrointestinal cancer, and both also contain anti-inflammatory flavonoid antioxidants.

6. Tomato

Tomatoes are high in folic acid and alpha-lipoic acid, which can help fight depression. Some studies have shown that people with depression are deficient in folic acid, which prevents the production of neurotransmitters from being suppressed. Alpha-lipoic acid helps convert glucose into energy and stabilizes mood.

7. Beans

Beans are digested slowly, helping to stabilize blood sugar and regulate mood. (Wang Renjun/Epoch Times)
Beans are digested slowly, helping to stabilize blood sugar and regulate mood. In fact, beans are considered an anti-diabetic and weight-loss food that can replace bread and other processed grains.

8. Apple

Like berries, apples are rich in antioxidants that can repair inflammation. Apples also contain a lot of soluble fiber, which helps the body balance blood sugar.

9. Protein rich foods

Certain forms of the protein seem to be especially helpful for people with depression. Tuna, turkey, and chickpeas are all antidepressant foods because they contain tryptophan, which is necessary to make serotonin.

Antioxidants are an important part of any nutritious diet, and even more so in an antidepressant diet.

The brain is vulnerable to free radical damage, which are damaged molecules that can lead to problems such as inflammation, premature aging and cell death. So if you can get rid of free radicals, you might be able to avoid emotional problems. Antioxidant-rich foods can reduce the damage caused by free radicals. Vitamin E, vitamin C, and vitamin A (beta-carotene) are antioxidants commonly found in everyday foods.

7 Foods That Worse Depression

While it’s hard to say that food causes depression, there is some evidence that in people who are prone to depression, certain foods can make it worse. Here are seven foods linked to symptoms of depression:

Refined sugar: Sweets taste great, but refined sugar can cause a spike in blood sugar, potentially triggering a sugar hangover (headaches, lethargy, etc.) that can affect mood and drain energy.

Artificial sweeteners: Avoid aspartame, which blocks serotonin production, causing mood swings, headaches, and insomnia. Other artificial sweeteners may also cause mood problems.

Refined and Processed Foods: White bread, pasta, and some snack foods are refined or processed carbohydrates that can have a big impact on blood sugar when eaten, spike insulin, and end up feeling tired and depressed.

Hydrogenated oil: If you are prone to depression, it is best to avoid fried chicken, fried squid and French fries. Foods cooked with hydrogenated oil and containing trans fats are factors that cause depression. Refined cooking oils like corn oil, rich in omega-6 fatty acids, can cause brain inflammation and worsen symptoms of depression.

Foods cooked in hydrogenated oils and containing trans fats are a contributing factor to depression. (Pixabay)
Sodium: Eating too much sodium can affect the nervous system and cause fatigue, and may also lead to edema.

Alcohol: Alcohol is one of the most banned substances for depression. Alcohol has pronounced effects on the central nervous system, slowing thinking, comprehension, and analysis, and worsening depressive symptoms. .

Caffeine: Some medical researchers believe that even moderate amounts of caffeine can be bad for depression and anxiety. Because caffeine can interfere with sleep and affect mood, it is best for people with depression to reduce their intake.

Depression, whether mild or severe, needs to be treated according to medical guidelines. If you feel depressed for a long time, you should seek medical attention as soon as possible. With the advice of a doctor, some people can get rid of their symptoms with an antidepressant diet, and some people need to combine other forms of treatment to help regulate their emotions and get out of depression.

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Summary

A recent study published in the journal BMC Medicine showed that people with moderate to severe depression experienced improved mood when they ate a healthier diet. Eating healthy means eating whole foods and avoiding refined, fried, and sweet foods.

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