New Research: Short-Guy is More Angry than Tall

Recently, researchers at the Centers for Disease Control in Atlanta, Georgia, questioned about 600 men between the ages of 18 and 50 about the concept of men’s gender, self-image and behavior with regard to drug abuse, anger and crime.

Recently, researchers at the Centers for Disease Control in Atlanta, Georgia, questioned about 600 men between the ages of 18 and 50 about the concept of men’s gender, self-image and behavior with regard to drug abuse, anger and crime.

Scientists found men who felt the least masculine were more likely to commit criminal acts.

According to the study, men who consider themselves less masculine, also known as “male-to-male tension,” were nearly three times more likely to commit violent weapons attacks or attacks that resulted in injury.

A few years ago, a team of researchers at the University of Oxford also claimed that “short-guy syndrome” was real.

They reported that low stature can increase feelings of weakness as well as raise levels of paranoia. Also known as Napoleon’s Node.

While modern society is more superficial and focuses more and more on body standards of both sexes, height becomes a taboo subject for many men.

It is very likely that these studies included a very small group of test groups, and therefore it is difficult to accurately describe the behavioral trends of a person based on his length.

Just to illustrate, Napoleon was actually 5 feet 7 inches, about seven hundred centimeters, which is basically the average length of our time. To add some perspective, this taller than the star of the film star Jet Li!

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