Scientists Invent ‘Bait’ to Kill Cancer Tumors

The bait molecule works to attract proteins in cancer cells that normally tend to stick to other substances within the body and help them multiply.

The tests, conducted in mice, showed that the hidden technique damaged the functions of cancer cells, and also contributed to slow growth of tumors.

The researchers hope their scientific work will cut a further step toward a cure that targets different types of cancer.

To date, there is no cancer treatment targeting the proteins involved, according to the researchers, who are from the Medical Research Institute at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. The study was published in the journal Nature Communications.

Once the association occurs, proteins are prevented from binding to natural RNA molecules in cancer cells.

The scientists tested the taste molecules on breast and brain cancer cells in the laboratory, and found that these results show that the bait molecule can inhibit the malignant characteristics of the thromboembolism and breast cancer cells. ”

They also experimented with “taste molecules” in brain-injected brain cancer cells in healthy mice, which were killed after 3 weeks and tumor analysis. The mice, which were given the bait particles, were infected with tumors much smaller than those found in mice that were not Treat them.

Scientists are interested in how DNA transduction is involved, a key step in gene expression in cancer and other diseases.

Because connectivity plays an important role in understanding the causes of disease at the molecular level, scientists are looking for ways in which the proteins that control this process can contribute to the development of cancers and tumors.

In recent years scientists have discovered that tumors show abnormal delivery patterns compared to normal tissues, but have not been able to find drugs that directly inhibit the activity of the conduction factors.

Reviewer overview

Scientists Invent 'Bait' to Kill Cancer Tumors - /10

Summary

The bait molecule works to attract proteins in cancer cells that normally tend to stick to other substances within the body and help them multiply.

0 Bad!

24 Comments

Leave a Comment